CURATING A TRASH-LIGHT KITCHEN

WORDS & IMAGES: KATE WEINER

As stewards of sustainability, it's vital that each one of us embody the positive changes that we want in this world. Living a trash-light life has not only helped me significantly reduce my footprint, but it has also brought so much sweet simplicity and succulence into my life. Although waste is a HUGE issue in our country—the average American produces 4.3 pounds of trash every single day—it's the kind of problem that we can truly tackle through a series of simple swaps. And the best place to begin this journey is in our kitchens, where many of the finer things in life (food, gathering with friends, late night snacks) comes to pass. 

Shopping for groceries, cooking nourishing meals, and eating damn good food should be a luscious, life-affirming act rather than a source of unnecessary waste. In that spirit, we're sharing three switches you can make this very day to simplify your kitchen shelf and minimize trash. Get to it!

USE BEE'S WRAP instead of PLASTIC WRAP

I'm in love with Bee's Wrap. This durable, biodegradable wrap is great for baking bread (you can use it to cover dough as it rises), wrapping up sandwiches for on-the-go lunches, and storing fruit and veg. 

SWAP SWEDISH DISCLOTHS for PAPER TOWELS

Have you ever walked into a public bathroom and been shocked at the sheer number of garbage cans overflowing with crumpled paper towels? When we freely use paper towels in our kitchen, we're doing much of the same. Swedish Dishcloths are a reusable, effective, and super absorbent alternative. 

TRY CELLULOSE-BASED SPONGES rather than PLASTIC SPONGES

Plastic-based sponges are a seriously sneaky source of waste. Plant-based sponges might be pricier but they last longer and, when properly disposed of, biodegrade. That's way worth the extra buck. 

 

When we take responsibility for our waste, we empower ourselves and those we live with to do better by our shared world. Sure, these above solutions are small steps, but that doesn't mean they aren't any less vital. If every household were to adopt these easy practices, we could divert quite literally tons of waste from entering landfills, eroding land, and contaminating our soils. And that's pretty major.  

 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT:

Why I Live Trash-Light

Shop Sustainably On A Budget

Why Small Steps Matter